“I loved class with Dr. Lowe, she’s helped me find a comfortable place within the world of political science," says Catherine Foradori, Political Science and English double major '15


 Political science is the study of power: how power is acquired; the challenges to retaining power; and the impact of power on the relationship between citizens and the institutions of government.  

 

Political Science majors study governments, public policy, and the political behavior of individuals and institutions. Our program in political science employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine issues that impact the social, political, economic, cultural, and geographic issues in the United States and the world. Students consider issues of control, freedom, gender, and influence as they study and assess the manner in which power and authority has impacted the development and organization of societies, relations between and among nations, and the management of war and conflict.

First- and second-year students are required to complete introductory courses in: American politics, comparative politics or international relations, and political theory, which provide foundations for examining the concepts, organizations, and models that are at the core of the study of power and policies of the U.S. and internationally. In the junior and senior years, students are required to complete a research methods sequence and internship capstone experience.

Note: Students may declare a major in political science upon enrollment at Carlow University or at any time before the second semester of their junior year of study. In order to be accepted into the major in political science, students first must complete POL 101: Introduction to American Government and receive a grade of "B" or better. Majors will complete the social change cohort, foundational courses, the research methods sequence, and nine (9) credits of elective courses in the discipline.


Bachelor of Science in Political Science

Degree: Bachelor of Science
Location: Main Oakland Campus

Courses 

POL 240 : The Politics Of Terrorism

An exploration of related topics such as political culture, social culture, religion, and political organizations and their links to "terrorism." This course will explore the concept of terrorism, the use of violence, the dynamics of war, the political economy of former colonial regimes, dependent economies, and how the world's distribution of resources affects state nations.

POL 335 : Mock Trial Court And Court Advocacy

This course provides an opportunity to learn firsthand about the work of attorneys in the courtroom, understand the judicial system, sharpen critical thinking, and refine public speaking ability. Students will explore the fundamental process of the adversarial system of justice, including the basic rules of trial procedure and evidence. The course will combine mock trial exercises, demonstrations, and class discussion to enable students to develop skills of advocacy.